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Hello and welcome to this website! I’m Russ Popp, a retired Canadian Outfitter and Guide for fishing and hunting I am very pleased about the…

When to motorize?

The nature of the problem

Should I motorize my fishing kayak, and if so, when, and with whet kind of motor – A battery powered electric outboard motor, or a small, portable outboard gas engine?
These are questions that many kayak anglers ask themselves, for various reasons starting from being tired of spending so much time and efforts paddling or pedaling to one’s favorite fishing hole, through a need to have a backup plan and the means for going back home in case the weather and/or current change, and through the wish to extend one’s range of travel, and go for long fishing trips, as motorized fishermen like to do.
This is comparable to the decision about getting a snow blower –
If you live in a region that gets a lot of snow in winter, and if your house happens to have a long driveway, you realize at some point that a snow shovel no longer works for you, and you need a snow blower. You’d obviously get a gas powered snow blower, because big snow storms are often accompanied by power outages…

What factors to consider?

1. Ergonomics and safety

The first factor to consider is the human factor – yourself: Do you feel capable and comfortable paddling long distances, or does paddling drain your energy before you even get to start casting your baits, lures, flies, net, or whatever tackle you use? This question has to do with more than comfort – it’s about safety as well. Paddling long distances and while being tired can cause injury, and in rare cases it can lead to accidents. Not everyone is young and fit, and in fact, most kayak anglers are either middle aged or elderly, and many don’t benefit from being athletic. Furthermore, problems such as overweight and back pain are common in these populations.

2. Weather and water conditions

You may be a great kayaker and eager to paddle, but bad weather and strong currents are stronger, and may cut your trip short, or make it extremely difficult for you to get back to your launching spot, and even just back to shore, due to lack of propulsion power. Even an electric trolling motor might not be powerful enough in extreme adverse conditions such as a storm, a sudden swell in a river, strong wind, a fast tidal current, etc.

3. Weight

An electric trolling motor weighs about half the weight of a small outboard gas engine, but the battery that powers it can weigh twice as much as an outboard motor. Such setup can be inconvenient in several ways, starting from carrying your kayak from your vehicle to the launching spot (and back), and if the battery runs out of electricity, you’d have to paddle a kayak that’s considerably heavier.

4. Cost – performance

While you can get a small electric trolling motor, battery and charger for less than $300, a new outboard motor would cost more than twice as much. But if you go for an electric motor powered by a Lithium-Ion battery, you could end up paying more than what you’d pay for a top of the line outboard gas engine, and you won’t necessarily be better served than if you got an outboard motor.

5. What type of kayak?

You can’t put an outboard motor on any fishing kayak – In order for the motorized kayak to be safe and comfortable, it needs to be ultra stable and fully ergonomic to begin with, and the only kayak that fits this description is the W500. Rigging other kayaks with an outboard motor could be anything from uncomfortable to hazardous. As for electric trolling motors, most fishing kayaks including SOT and SIK can take them, although results may vary…

Bottom line

In sum, if you need to go far, and the water you’re going through can get choppy or fast moving, and if the wind can drive you where you don’t want to go – you’d better outfit your fishing kayak with an outboard gas engine. In contrast, if you fish in smaller bodies of flat water, an electric trolling motor could very well do the job for you.

Kayaking and Kayak Fishing Website for Kids

There’s no doubt that levels of exercise among the youth of America are at an all time low. Kids would rather sit and play video-games than go outside and do something active. However, the W Fishing Kayak, which allows superior maneuverability and the ability to stand up, has kids and teens excited to actually do something physical- whether it be jumping in the boat or paddling standing up, the fun is endless. Youth kayak fishing is a new website that is dedicated to showing how much fun the new generation is having using the W Fishing Kayak- check it out!

Kayak Fishing That Is Smart For Your Pocket

While considering what kind of fishing kayak to purchase to fulfill your personal requirements, it is of high importance to your wallet to be conscious of the fact that the bottom-line price of a fishing kayak is almost always not limited to just the base cost of the kayak itself. When you factor in the additional cost of the countless accessories necessary to outfit a traditional kayak, you will find that the money piles up and that the add-ons can end up doubling your investment.
However, buying a Wavewalk fishing kayak eliminates much of these expenditures by eradicating the need for these hassling adjuncts.

  • Rudder: With superior tracking over competing traditional kayaks, the W kayak gets rid of the the need for a rudder. You save $220 – $300
  • Kayak Seat: W Kayaks do not contribute to yak-back, and thus do not necessitate any special seat. (Read more about that her) You save $80 – $200
  • Kayak Rack: W kayaks are easy to cartop and fit any car rack – No need to go out of your way for auxiliary kayak rack. You save $50 – $500.
  • Outriggers: The W500 kayak model is by far safer and more stable than traditional kayaks, even those equipped with outriggers. The W500 fishing kayak is so stable that their is zero need for outriggers, even with an attached electric trolling motor. You save $100 – $350.

Rudders are a hassle to use, they considerably slow you down, and get easily mired in shallow water and weeds.

Kayak seats are unhealthy for your back, and can turn a pleasant kayak fishing trip into an uncomfortable endeavor. It’s even possible that they will irritate you to the point that you quit kayak fishing in the long run, simply due to the mounting back pain and discomfort.

When using a traditional SOT or sit in kayak, you must place a kayak rack on top of your car rack, taking up a lot of space and disallowing you from carrying other things you may need on top of your car.

Outriggers, which are often necessary to establish adequate stability with the usage of a traditional kayak, are a pain to install, slow you down, and limit your kayak’s mobility and maneuverability. Out of the water, they’re just one more cumbersome thing to carry.

The bottom line is that the slew of accessories needed to utilize a traditional kayak: rudders, yak racks and outriggers, are annoying, expensive, and unwieldy.  The added cost of those accessories could top $1,000. Besides the financial investment, your health and peace of mind can be compromised by using these accessories in conjunction with a traditional yak.

In order to avoid endless hassle, discomfort, and a gaping hole in your wallet, go to Wavewalk’s website to find these fishing kayaks.

Stop Wasting Time And Hurting Yourself, And Stop Using Conventional Fishing Kayaks

Kayaks’ sub-par ergonomics are putting thousands of kayak anglers in harm’s way, a problem that is easily surmountable by switching to a more ergonomic kayak such as the W fishing kayak.

There are a variety of dangers associated with using a traditional kayak:
First, there’s the peril of being unable to paddle back to shore due to fatigue or exhaustion.
In addition, anglers who are elderly or inexperienced, or just plain tired, can be at risk from outside hazards outside of their control such as strong wind or tidal current. If kayaking in your traditional kayak makes you tired quickly, consider switching to something more comfortable, with better tracking and easier paddling, namely a Wavewalk kayak.

Seasonal problems, such as overheating in summer, and hypothermia in winter, are also big threats, since they drain your energy and make it difficult or even impossible to return to shore.
Traditional kayaks that expose the user to the elements are costly both on your health and your wallet, for when buying extra gear such as dry suits to protect yourself you are potentially forking up hundreds of unnecessary dollars. Other heavy clothing, such as boots and waders, can disable you from swimming, and from getting back into your boat, or kayak, a very precarious situation to say the least.

Paddlers of traditional fishing kayaks are also susceptible to cramps, leg numbness and even partial paralysis, a problem that is virtually nonexistent in the W Kayak.

Leg cramps can be very painful and long-lasting if you can’t stand up safely in your craft to loosen up. Sit-in and SOT kayaks restrict you to sitting in an L shape, with your legs forced forward and clamped by footrests. Paddling or fishing in this position for extended period of time all but guarantees the onset of cramps and leg numbness, a very uncomfortable paddling experience.
Both leg pain and leg numbness also prevent you from balancing and maneuvering your kayak efficiently, a very dangerous dilemma.

Pain in your back and butt can compromise your paddling ability. Moreover, you might find yourself near shore but still unable to beach your kayak, or get out of it, as Don, this California kayak angler describes in his kayak review:

“I fished for 8 years in the “L” sitting position and it’s effect on my back is what finished standard kayaking for me… One day I beached the bow of that 16 footer and was still about 10-12 feet out in the water where I was sitting.  I discovered I couldn’t move my legs.  Getting out of that thing without causing all kinds of laughter from spectators was one of my greatest physical accomplishments. I was sure I’d avoid those scenarios with the”W”, and I could hardly wait to find out all the wonderful differences.”
Read this entire kayak review >>

Examples like this are very common, many regular kayakers report experiencing similar discomforts with their sit-in and SOT kayaks. Many kayakers and kayak anglers have become so accustomed to this stiffness that they regularly stop their paddling and fishing just climb ashore and ‘unkink’. ‘Unkinking’ basically means stretching and allowing some reprieve for the tensed back and sore legs. This hassle is completely unnecessary when using the W Kayak because the user can easily stretch within the spacious confines of the craft itself, allowing you to finish uninterrupted and comfortably. So in order to enjoy more hours of kayak fishing without the pain, danger, and hassle of traditional SOT and sit-in kayaks, make the switch to the W Kayak, and if you want, learn more about kayak fishing pains on Wavewak’s website.