MOTORIZE IT!

2012 was the year of the motorized fishing kayak – Not just a common sit-n or SOT kayak outfitted with a lame electric trolling motor, but the real thing: a motorboat as American anglers understand it, and this means a boat powered by a gas engine – typically an outboard motor.
And by motorboat we don’t mean one that offers just inland fishing on flat water but cannot be used for offshore fishing – What we’re talking about is real ocean fishing capabilities, from surf launching to trips that are several times longer than what electric motors may enable before they run out of electricity.
This also means sufficient stability for stand up fishing, dryness (sorry, we don’t buy the notion that kayak fishing is a wet sport…), sufficient storage space for long trips, and a comfort level that’s acceptable for anyone, and not just for young, lightweight and athletic fishermen.
And when trailers are concerned – we find that unless you’re looking for a boat that will carry you and several passengers on board, you can and should do without a trailer, not just because of the additional expense, but also because it takes room in your yard, and it takes precious time from each and every fishing trip you make. And when you consider the fact that a trailer also limits your launching and beaching options to the same spot, and one that features a boat ramp, we’re talking about a new level of freedom…

No-motor-zones? Not necessarily a problem when you can instantly switch to a human powered mode of propulsion – paddling in most cases, poling in shallow water, and rowing if you prefer!

This is no longer an experimental concept – People enjoy the advantages of fishing out of W motor kayaks worldwide, and if you ask many of them, the boat they fish from is a personal skiff that offers some extra advantages compared to small motorboats (skiff, jon boat, bass boat, etc.) and kayaks.

From now, this online kayak fishing magazine will focus exclusively on Motorized Kayak Fishing. We’ll publish articles, videos and reviews related only to motorized fishing kayaks: Inland and offshore, in shallow and deep water, in cold climates and in warmer ones, in bass fishing trips and when fishing for other fish species.

Kayak Fishing With A Motor

Electric trolling motors can be energy-saving on kayaking trips, but once the battery dies, a unfortunately common situation, you may find yourself stuck a sizable distance from your initial launching spot. When this occurs, you will have no other choice but to paddle your fishing kayak, with a cumbersome battery on board, all the way back the way you came, possibly against wind and/or current. In addition, the propeller of the electric trolling motor tends to become entangled in submerged fishing lines, seaweed, and other underwater obstacles, especially in shallow water, a common locale to go fishing with your kayak.

You may want to use a two cycle engine, but small, two cycle outboard gas motors have a propensity for unreliability, and are notoriously difficult to start. To add insult to injury, they are particularly stinky, and often irritatingly loud. Such motors can be especially problematic when taking your fishing kayak in shallow water.

It’s plain common sense that people don’t get stronger with age, and many senior anglers find they can’t go fishing from kayaks because they don’t have the strength necessary to paddle long distances and in inclement conditions, such as against the wind, or current.

Taking all of these problems into consideration, such senior kayak anglers may be interested by a new method of motorizing fishing kayaks and other small water craft, which involves utilizing a gas engine to create a powerful stream of air, rather than the traditional set up of a rotating propeller in the water. In addition, the motor used is a sleek, modern, 4-cycle (4 stroke) engine that is a cinch to start, easy to maintain,lacks the need for mixing oil and fuel, does not create odorous fumes, and is quieter. All of this superior performance is achieved without it being heavier than a 2 stroke engine of the same size:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvb_WFOMYsM?rel=0&w=560&h=315]

If you’re seeking to provide your kayak with even more power and speed you can also paddle while the motor is running. There’s no requisite to hold the tiller (steering handle) if going in a straight line, and you can simply steer with your paddle, making occasional adjustments in the tiller’s position.

The new motor setup is lightweight enough to allow you to place the outfitted kayak on your car top with no danger or hassle. Most importantly for your wallet however, this setup uses a converted backpack leaf blower that will run you a mere $200, so it wouldn’t be very pricey to rig your fishing kayak with one.

Kayak Fishing In Freezing Canada

The phrase “Kayak Fishing in Canada” is sure to send a chill down (or up) your spine, doesn’t it?
Think about the cold water (brrr…) and the cold wind blowing (brrr as well…), and if you’re sitting in a SOT kayak or Sit In kayak you’re freezing – literally. But it doesn’t necessarily have to be like that, and not all fishing kayaks are prone to send you home with a wet butt and a running nose.

The notion of kayak fishing in Canada, a relentlessly cold area, will immediately bring up images of uncomfortably frigid trips and an overall undesirable experience.

The combination of bitterly cold wind and the constant splashing of icy water makes fishing from a traditional fishing kayak in Canada sound preposterous at any time except summer.

However, this need not be the case. Even though most fishing kayaks leave you with a soaked behind and a cold the next day, a new type of fishing kayak, dubbed the Wavewalk Fishing Kayak, will let you stay high, dry and out of the cold. The saddle design elevates you high above the water level, while increasing your stability and decreasing or even eliminating the chance that you will tumble into the cold Canadian waters. Even when fitted with outriggers, no fishing kayak matches the stability of the W.

Also, around the cockpit of this fishing kayak is an elevated lip, or freeboard, that protects the angler from freezing spray, a necessity while kayak fishing in Canada and any other cold climate in general.

Read more about kayak fishing in cold water on the Wavewalk blog>>

More Foam, More Lumbar Problems

Research on lumbar support in kayaks, demonstrates that remaining seated in the L position with footrest/backrest combo creates tension that is greatly unhealthy for your back, and results in an excessive amount of discomfort and pain.

Cushioning the seat of your fishing kayak with extra padding may alleviate pain for a short while, but it fails to solve the dilemma in the long run. What pushes the Lumbar spine up against the backrest while in the L position is the strongest muscles in your body, your legs, which are perpendicular to your back and are pushing against the footrest:
You don’t want something pushing against your back that can also propel you for long distances at running speeds, as well as lift your entire body of the ground when your jump. 

Your legs act as a sort of piston when in the L position, slamming your back against the backrest of your fishing kayak. Since there are very few bones and no large muscles in the are where the backrest and back meet, all the pressure is focused on a small area, your lumbar spine.

The forces pressing against your back are almost equivalent to the force needed to support your body weight, to put the pressure in perspective.

The harder you paddle, cast, or do other activities that require your legs to keep you in place, the more pressure is applied to your lumbar, or on top of your fishing kayak.

The more tired your body becomes, and the more uncomfortable, the more tense you become, and the more your legs have to work to keep you stable and in place, greatly increasing the pressure on your Lumbar spine, as well as exponentially increasing the pain, and creating an endless circle of fatigue.

Foam does not provide a good solution to the lumbar spine problem to start off, and due to foams compressing over time tendency, initial temporary relief will vanish after a time, and will increase the back resistance, as there is less movement room between your back and legs.

Also, if you are a heavier person, you have the possibility of experiencing butt pain, or as it is more commonly know among kayak fishing circles, yak ass, after kayak fishing in the L position. The nerves in your body, and the foam of your seat, will both become as compressed as pancakes. Leg numbness, leg pain, and butt pain are all directly correlated to compressed nerves, and are a common phenomena in the kayak fishing world. This intense pain is not a joke once you start feeling it, and has discouraged many prominent kayak anglers.

In summary, most sit-on top kayaks nowadays are equipped with heavily padded foam backrests, designed to reduce pain. Even with these specially designed seats, kayak anglers that use these fishing kayaks experience many of these symptoms: Fatigue, back soreness, yak ass, yak back, and leg pain. This creates a need for rest periods, where you must interrupt your kayak fishing for a “un-kinking” rest break.

In the Wavewalk fishing kayak, there is no L position, instead there is the Riding Position. Similar to riding a horse, your legs support your body weight, while helping you paddle, balance, and fish.

This revolutionary new type of fishing kayak allows the angler to change between a number of other positions at any time, which include the Standing Up position and the Sitting position (this position is like being seated in a canoe) . This means you can relax, stretch, and fish comfortably for very long stretches of time, without having the problem of pain, numbness, or soreness in any part of your body.