MOTORIZE IT!

2012 was the year of the motorized fishing kayak – Not just a common sit-n or SOT kayak outfitted with a lame electric trolling motor, but the real thing: a motorboat as American anglers understand it, and this means a boat powered by a gas engine – typically an outboard motor.
And by motorboat we don’t mean one that offers just inland fishing on flat water but cannot be used for offshore fishing – What we’re talking about is real ocean fishing capabilities, from surf launching to trips that are several times longer than what electric motors may enable before they run out of electricity.
This also means sufficient stability for stand up fishing, dryness (sorry, we don’t buy the notion that kayak fishing is a wet sport…), sufficient storage space for long trips, and a comfort level that’s acceptable for anyone, and not just for young, lightweight and athletic fishermen.
And when trailers are concerned – we find that unless you’re looking for a boat that will carry you and several passengers on board, you can and should do without a trailer, not just because of the additional expense, but also because it takes room in your yard, and it takes precious time from each and every fishing trip you make. And when you consider the fact that a trailer also limits your launching and beaching options to the same spot, and one that features a boat ramp, we’re talking about a new level of freedom…

No-motor-zones? Not necessarily a problem when you can instantly switch to a human powered mode of propulsion – paddling in most cases, poling in shallow water, and rowing if you prefer!

This is no longer an experimental concept – People enjoy the advantages of fishing out of W motor kayaks worldwide, and if you ask many of them, the boat they fish from is a personal skiff that offers some extra advantages compared to small motorboats (skiff, jon boat, bass boat, etc.) and kayaks.

From now, this online kayak fishing magazine will focus exclusively on Motorized Kayak Fishing. We’ll publish articles, videos and reviews related only to motorized fishing kayaks: Inland and offshore, in shallow and deep water, in cold climates and in warmer ones, in bass fishing trips and when fishing for other fish species.

Midwestern Anglers’ Dream Fishing Kayak

It’s common knowledge that many people in the Midwest love fishing, and that the Midwest fields some of the greatest places to fish in America, and arguably the world.

Midwest anglers, however, seem to ignore a lot of the hype about kayak fishing, sticking to the time-tested method of fishing from motorboats. Dryness and comfort are paramount to these anglers and sit-in and sit-on-top fishing kayaks just don’t make the cut in their book.

When it’s impossible to get out of your kayak and get into the shallow and lukewarm water that Southern anglers enjoy to unkink, and assuage the pain and fatigue in your legs, your back, and your butt, it just makes sense to keep fishing from a real boat, and leave those new-age, experimental kayaks to others.

If traditional kayaks were your only option this attitude would be completely justified, but with that said, kayak fishing doesn’t necessarily have to be such an unappealing experience if you’re fishing out of the right kayak. It seems like a select few anglers have started to discover a solution to this problem, the Wavewalk  Fishing Kayak. These anglers have realized that there’s a way to fish that combines the maneuverability, ease of use, and inexpensiveness of a kayak with the stability, dryness, and comfort of the traditional motorboat. On top of all this, this fishing kayak offers some new and refreshing features, such as super mobility, and aesthetic appeal.

To read more about kayak fishing in the Midwest, and kayak fishing in general, you can read through Wavewalk’s blog for more information.  In this blog you can find plenty of info about kayak dealers, kayak fishing trip reports, rigging tips, kayak fishing movies, and fishing kayak reviews.

So, if you’re from the Midwest, or are just an avid angler interested in fishing for bass, pike, salmon, trout, walleye, or whatever may capture your attention, check it out.

Kayak Fishing With A Motor

Electric trolling motors can be energy-saving on kayaking trips, but once the battery dies, a unfortunately common situation, you may find yourself stuck a sizable distance from your initial launching spot. When this occurs, you will have no other choice but to paddle your fishing kayak, with a cumbersome battery on board, all the way back the way you came, possibly against wind and/or current. In addition, the propeller of the electric trolling motor tends to become entangled in submerged fishing lines, seaweed, and other underwater obstacles, especially in shallow water, a common locale to go fishing with your kayak.

You may want to use a two cycle engine, but small, two cycle outboard gas motors have a propensity for unreliability, and are notoriously difficult to start. To add insult to injury, they are particularly stinky, and often irritatingly loud. Such motors can be especially problematic when taking your fishing kayak in shallow water.

It’s plain common sense that people don’t get stronger with age, and many senior anglers find they can’t go fishing from kayaks because they don’t have the strength necessary to paddle long distances and in inclement conditions, such as against the wind, or current.

Taking all of these problems into consideration, such senior kayak anglers may be interested by a new method of motorizing fishing kayaks and other small water craft, which involves utilizing a gas engine to create a powerful stream of air, rather than the traditional set up of a rotating propeller in the water. In addition, the motor used is a sleek, modern, 4-cycle (4 stroke) engine that is a cinch to start, easy to maintain,lacks the need for mixing oil and fuel, does not create odorous fumes, and is quieter. All of this superior performance is achieved without it being heavier than a 2 stroke engine of the same size:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvb_WFOMYsM?rel=0&w=560&h=315]

If you’re seeking to provide your kayak with even more power and speed you can also paddle while the motor is running. There’s no requisite to hold the tiller (steering handle) if going in a straight line, and you can simply steer with your paddle, making occasional adjustments in the tiller’s position.

The new motor setup is lightweight enough to allow you to place the outfitted kayak on your car top with no danger or hassle. Most importantly for your wallet however, this setup uses a converted backpack leaf blower that will run you a mere $200, so it wouldn’t be very pricey to rig your fishing kayak with one.

Fix Deformities In Your Fishing Kayak

Hull scratching can happen when your fishing kayak drags over serrated surfaces, such as concrete ramps, oyster bars, and sharp rocks. Scratches are usually nothing more than trivial blemishes, and do not require serious attention.

Nevertheless, if you want to avoid scratches on your fishing kayak, watch out for hazards in the water, especially when fishing or paddling in shallow water.

Kayak fishing and paddling from a higher spot than normal kayaks offers you an advantage in noticing possible hazards before scraping against them. Kayaks such as the W fishing kayak offer this advantage, as W anglers will affirm. This higher spot is also helpful in detecting fish.

When repairing scratches in plastic kayaks, the method is similar, even with different depths and lengths of the scratch. For cosmetic scratches, no repairs are recommended, but if you want to do something, you can just heat the scratch using a propane blow torch.

Apply the flame over the scratch slowly and tentatively until it disappears or diminishes considerably, while not overheating the space, to not cause a deformity.

Direct the fire in an acute angle, and not directly in the front. This will decrease the chances of accidental overheating.

(Caution: Heating plastic will change its color)

Spoon and Hand torch, used for repair

For deep cuts, warm the end of a metal spoon, and administer the tip moderately along the cut, welding it shut.

As well as in shallow cuts, be careful not to overheat, and deform the plastic

Cuts in a polyethylene kayaks, which do not occur often, must be fixed correctly: Welding will not fix a broken hull, but welding a patch to the interior of the kayak on the cracked area, will resolve the problem. This is because if welded, the hull in the broken area will be much weaker than other areas, and may reopen while kayak fishing or paddling.

Cracks above the waterline can be patched with rivets, which is not recommended for lower breaches.

Protecting the hand that is wielding your device is very important, as metal conducts heat.

Beware and remove any possible flammable materials, and do not direct the fire at others, as well as keeping children and pets far away.
(If you lack in experience in using blow torches and hot objects, it is not advised that you undertake in these projects)

Kayak Fishing Pain With Jeff

Experienced kayak angler from Florida, Jeff McGovern has made some observations:

“Yet another problem in fishing kayaks is shoulder pain, as some of my common kayak friends have talked about- they often communicate that they need to get multiple shoulder problems fixed. Certain anglers have deformities on their shoulders which can be immediate threats. His main problem is casting from his sit on top kayak, which is very painful for his shoulder. The awkward casting angles are painful for my friend as well as others, so he is forced to fish by standing in the water and wade fishing. My friend is twenty five, and there should be no way a product is so painful to use, even for very young people. Whereas conventional kayaks limit your kayak fishing abilities, my Wavewalk fishing kayak offers a tremendous advantage when I power cast. I’ve never had to experience the described  pain in casting from the low L position, as my fishing kayak allows you to fish from a superior position.”

To get a better grasp of these problems, ask yourself these question:
Who in their right mind casts from docks or from large motorboats cast sitting with their legs perpendicular to their back? Who would subject themselves to this uncomfortable posture of their own volition, especially if less painful alternatives are available, like fishing standing up?

Of course no one fishes in the L posture while on land or in large boats, and no one has even considered it.

In different terms, this posture should never be considered suitable for kayak fishing, but conventional sit-in and sit-on fishing kayaks have no reasonable alternative. Anglers do not want to spend time and money with larger fishing boats, they must deal with this inconvenient hindrance to their enjoyment of kayak fishing, yo even be able to fish.”

As stated, conventional fishing kayaks all have this problem, so why not look towards the unconventional? The perfect fishing kayak would have an innovative new ability to use alternate postures. One such kayak comes to mind: The Wavewalk fishing kayak, mentioned in McGovern’s quote. This fishing kayak offers the ability to utilize new positions, like the riding and standing position, through its saddle, which allows for more powerful casting and a better overall experience when kayak fishing.

 Shoulder pain in kayak fishing while casting is discussed often in the kayak fishing world, and there are many articles written on it.