Own A Kayak Fishing Dealership After You Retire

For many longtime anglers retirement sounds like a golden chance to have as much free time as they want to follow their passion of fishing, boats, etc…
While this relaxed life appeases some retirees, for others it seems like their life is lacking some action – they want to do something extra that would add some more fun and excitement to their lives, and even bolster their income.
Here’s a few life long anglers who upon retirement opened their very own fishing kayak dealership:

Gene Andrews, High and Dry Kayaks – Florida

Fishing Kayaks, Northeastern Florida, Palm Coast

Gene Andrews, who retired several years ago, moved to Palm Coast, in Northeastern Florida, south of Jacksonville – the kayak fishing capital of the world, in order to pursue his passion of kayak fishing.

Due to the ubiquitous yak-back problem that afflicts many older anglers, Gene bought himself a W500, the only back pain free kayak out there. Gene fished from it contentedly and free of back pain, and eventually realized he could further his love of the Wavewalk Kayak by starting his own dealership where he could resell this fishing kayak locally.
Visit Gene’s website, High and Dry Kayaks, which sells W fishing kayaks in Palm Coast >>

 

Will Kayak Fishing Be An Extreme Sport In The Future?

Kayak fishing is viewed as an extreme sport by most people who fish from more traditional settings, i.e. motorboats and dry land. The factors that make kayak fishing relatively extreme are:

Compared to motorboats, fishing kayaks offer inadequate stability and they basic comfort. In addition, they fail to provide a real storage solution. Fishing kayaks are notoriously unstable, and are extremely uncomfortable, in comparison to motor boats.

The Unfulfilled Promise

Although tens of millions of Americans fish from motorboats, only one in a thousand fish out of a kayak. This is after more than a decade of hype about ‘kayak fishing being the fastest growing outdoors sport in America’. The fishing kayak’s promise was an inexpensive, easy to use, lightweight, car top boat. It also promised to deliver a sporty outdoor experience.  The huge majority of US anglers followed neither kayak anglers nor kayak vendors’ hype. The growth in kayak fishing participation is much slower in recent years than it was in the beginning of the century. It is possible that the market matured. This is the result of participants being less enthusiastic, and a high rate of participants dropping  out of the sport, which has been typical of kayak fishing since the beginning.

But kayak fishing is very uncomfortable if you’re fishing out of a sit-on-top (SOT) kayak, sit-in kayak, or a hybrid kayak. When you fish out of a W kayak, you experience a comfort that’s equal to that of fishing from a motorboat. Some W kayak fans may say it is more comfy.

The level of stability an angler benefits from when they fish out of a W500 kayak is equal to that offered by a typical small sized motorboat, namely that they don’t have to constantly balance the kayak. Fishing standing up is easy, and can be done with confidence, unlike all other fishing kayaks.

Only the W500 offers sufficient storage space that is dry and accessible, even for long fishing and camping trips that require carrying on board a lot of cumbersome gear that only canoes and small motorboats can carry.

Kayak Fishing In The Future

If kayak fishing has a future, it is not as an extreme sport. Kayak fishing’s future  depends on it becoming a popular leisure activity that is comfortable and easy, namely, the future of kayak fishing is W kayak fishing.


Kayak Fishing Pain With Jeff

Experienced kayak angler from Florida, Jeff McGovern has made some observations:

“Yet another problem in fishing kayaks is shoulder pain, as some of my common kayak friends have talked about- they often communicate that they need to get multiple shoulder problems fixed. Certain anglers have deformities on their shoulders which can be immediate threats. His main problem is casting from his sit on top kayak, which is very painful for his shoulder. The awkward casting angles are painful for my friend as well as others, so he is forced to fish by standing in the water and wade fishing. My friend is twenty five, and there should be no way a product is so painful to use, even for very young people. Whereas conventional kayaks limit your kayak fishing abilities, my Wavewalk fishing kayak offers a tremendous advantage when I power cast. I’ve never had to experience the described  pain in casting from the low L position, as my fishing kayak allows you to fish from a superior position.”

To get a better grasp of these problems, ask yourself these question:
Who in their right mind casts from docks or from large motorboats cast sitting with their legs perpendicular to their back? Who would subject themselves to this uncomfortable posture of their own volition, especially if less painful alternatives are available, like fishing standing up?

Of course no one fishes in the L posture while on land or in large boats, and no one has even considered it.

In different terms, this posture should never be considered suitable for kayak fishing, but conventional sit-in and sit-on fishing kayaks have no reasonable alternative. Anglers do not want to spend time and money with larger fishing boats, they must deal with this inconvenient hindrance to their enjoyment of kayak fishing, yo even be able to fish.”

As stated, conventional fishing kayaks all have this problem, so why not look towards the unconventional? The perfect fishing kayak would have an innovative new ability to use alternate postures. One such kayak comes to mind: The Wavewalk fishing kayak, mentioned in McGovern’s quote. This fishing kayak offers the ability to utilize new positions, like the riding and standing position, through its saddle, which allows for more powerful casting and a better overall experience when kayak fishing.

 Shoulder pain in kayak fishing while casting is discussed often in the kayak fishing world, and there are many articles written on it.

More Foam, More Lumbar Problems

Research on lumbar support in kayaks, demonstrates that remaining seated in the L position with footrest/backrest combo creates tension that is greatly unhealthy for your back, and results in an excessive amount of discomfort and pain.

Cushioning the seat of your fishing kayak with extra padding may alleviate pain for a short while, but it fails to solve the dilemma in the long run. What pushes the Lumbar spine up against the backrest while in the L position is the strongest muscles in your body, your legs, which are perpendicular to your back and are pushing against the footrest:
You don’t want something pushing against your back that can also propel you for long distances at running speeds, as well as lift your entire body of the ground when your jump. 

Your legs act as a sort of piston when in the L position, slamming your back against the backrest of your fishing kayak. Since there are very few bones and no large muscles in the are where the backrest and back meet, all the pressure is focused on a small area, your lumbar spine.

The forces pressing against your back are almost equivalent to the force needed to support your body weight, to put the pressure in perspective.

The harder you paddle, cast, or do other activities that require your legs to keep you in place, the more pressure is applied to your lumbar, or on top of your fishing kayak.

The more tired your body becomes, and the more uncomfortable, the more tense you become, and the more your legs have to work to keep you stable and in place, greatly increasing the pressure on your Lumbar spine, as well as exponentially increasing the pain, and creating an endless circle of fatigue.

Foam does not provide a good solution to the lumbar spine problem to start off, and due to foams compressing over time tendency, initial temporary relief will vanish after a time, and will increase the back resistance, as there is less movement room between your back and legs.

Also, if you are a heavier person, you have the possibility of experiencing butt pain, or as it is more commonly know among kayak fishing circles, yak ass, after kayak fishing in the L position. The nerves in your body, and the foam of your seat, will both become as compressed as pancakes. Leg numbness, leg pain, and butt pain are all directly correlated to compressed nerves, and are a common phenomena in the kayak fishing world. This intense pain is not a joke once you start feeling it, and has discouraged many prominent kayak anglers.

In summary, most sit-on top kayaks nowadays are equipped with heavily padded foam backrests, designed to reduce pain. Even with these specially designed seats, kayak anglers that use these fishing kayaks experience many of these symptoms: Fatigue, back soreness, yak ass, yak back, and leg pain. This creates a need for rest periods, where you must interrupt your kayak fishing for a “un-kinking” rest break.

In the Wavewalk fishing kayak, there is no L position, instead there is the Riding Position. Similar to riding a horse, your legs support your body weight, while helping you paddle, balance, and fish.

This revolutionary new type of fishing kayak allows the angler to change between a number of other positions at any time, which include the Standing Up position and the Sitting position (this position is like being seated in a canoe) . This means you can relax, stretch, and fish comfortably for very long stretches of time, without having the problem of pain, numbness, or soreness in any part of your body.